The Big Decision

Dad went in for his latest MRI scan this past Wednesday. The family all gathered on Thursday to meet with Dr. Baimeedi to go over the results.

The Results
Great news, everything is stable, there is no tumor growth.

There has not been any tumor growth since going off chemo + radiation. This could not be better news. We were able to review each scan over the past 4 months and see for ourselves.

In each scan, there is a black cavity, which is where the tumor used to be (this will never go away).

Around a portion of the border of this cavity is a bright white spot (this is the tumor, any cancer cells will show up as white).

What I personally noticed in each scan was that there appeared to be white particles/fragments originating from the bright white spot and swirling away from it into the cavity. The only thing that came to mind for me was the Protocel, as it specifically stated you very well might see tumor fragments breaking away.

The problem is that an MRI isn’t high enough detail for us to be sure and there is no other type of brain scan to provide said detail.

Chemo
The first thing the doc said when entering the room was, “So Jay, when are you going back on chemo?”. We were all left with that brick-to-the-face look and did not know what to say.

The doc admitted that earlier in the week he learned that dad had not been on chemo at all, when he thought he had been.

Talk about a major lapse in communication and medical record review.

Ultimately, that is the way we’ve wanted it. If the tumor is stable, and he’s taking Protocel, in our minds, there is no reason to go on chemo.

Throughout the remainder of the meeting, the doc heavily stressed/pressured dad to go back on chemo. In fact I remember him saying, “Jay, I want you to call me and tell me you’ve made the right choice.” What ever happened to, “Jay, what would you like to do”?

To really drive the nail in, the doc made a point of saying, multiple times, “Jay, if I was your son, I would want you to do chemo”. Let’s just say I no longer care for this doctor.

Regardless of what anyone else thinks, he was slapping me in the face, whether he meant it or not. I’m sure he does a great job with his patients, but unfortunately¬†all respect from my point of view has been lost.

2nd Opinion
I made mention to the family about getting a second opinion.

We already have a doctor in mind based off a well respected individual’s recommendations. Dad is still deciding whether or not he wants to go this route.

Decision Time
Dad, the thinker that he is, will be spending the coming days thinking over everything.

His first reaction to the meeting with the doc was to go back onto the high doses of chemo near the end of October. This would be 5 days on, then off the remainder of the month, repeat for 6 months.

Ultimately, regardless of what I feel about the doctor, this is dad’s life and it is his choice to make. Whatever he ends up choosing, I will support his decision.

Whatever the outcome is, he has had a renewed sense of life and we’ve been given the gift of time, something that we are very fortunate to have.

The only thing I ask, keep up the positive thoughts/prayers/comments/etc. I have a firm belief that positivity has healing powers beyond our comprehension.

As always, I will keep everyone posted.